The power of Vim Plugins: netrw

November 3, 2015

This time we look into an alternative for NERDTree, which is called netrw. Thanks to aguerosantiale, who put my attention onto it. Both plugins serve the same purpose, but they behave fundamentaly different in archiving this.

So the first question you will probably ask is: “why use netrw, if I’m already familiar with NERDTree?”. The biggest plus for netrw is, that you don’t have to download anything. If you set nocampatible in your .vimrc you are able to use it. So if you are on a different machine, for example connected via ssh, you are able to use netrw. The second point is, that vim is very reactive by nature, but if you have too many plugins running at the same time, you could destroy this attribute. So it’s always good to use something, what is already there.

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The power of Vim Plugins: NERDTree

October 16, 2015

Hey everyone, this time we will cover a plugin called NERDTree. This is the kind of addition, which shows the file system with all it’s files and sub folders. It is a great tool to keep an overview, when working on a project or a big set of files.

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The power of Vim Plugins: Vundle

September 29, 2015

To start of this series properly, we need a plugin manager, to handle all our plugins and keep them up to date. Vundle is one common option, but there are some more to choose from. Two more big players in this business are NeoBundle and Pathogen. I didn’t looked too deep into the last two plugin managers. To be honest, I never tried out something else than Vundle and I think the reason is that I never felt uncomfortable or missed something. So I never felt in need of getting another plugin manager and in this post I want to show you why.

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The power of Vim Plugins

September 16, 2015

In this post I want to introduce a new series, which will cover some of the most useful Vim plugins available.

There are many guides and tutorials out there about how Vim works and how great its modal editing is. So I won’t cover these things in this series. I personally learned a lot from the book Practical Vim by Drew Neil. He also published a lot of video tutorials, called VimCasts. Before I started of with Vim, I was using Sublime Text and as I started using Vim, I missed some essential knowledge about how to install, configure and use plugins. Part of the problem was, that everyone is telling you: “When you start of with Vim, learn it without any plugins first, so you get used to the modal editing.” Well this isn’t completely correct, because those are two different pairs of shoes. Of course it’s more to learn at once, but many people don’t want to learn Vim completely and then start installing plugins until they find out, that something they need very bad, isn’t available in Vim. So they wasted about 2 months of their life until they can go on with the next tool on their list. Luckily there is not much missing, to transform Vim into a good programming tool, in my opinion. For me it became my one and only code editing/writing tool for work, studying and hobby projects.

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